About Pablo Kleinman

Pablo Kleinman arrived in Los Angeles in early 1985 at the age of 13 following in the footsteps of his relatives who began settling in Southern California in the 1940’s. After several years of helping to build his family’s businesses, Pablo’s father set up his first small business in America: a small plastic laminate wholesaler and distributor in South Central Los Angeles.

While attending Emerson Middle School in West L.A., a family friend, who was an engineer for NASA, introduced Pablo to computers. Pablo was immediately hooked on the new technology and soon got involved in amateur computer networking. Between 1987 and 1991, Pablo coordinated the development of the Latin American branch of FidoNet, the first free, public-access computer network from Baja California to Patagonia. FidoNet was the first email network in Latin America.

The week Pablo turned 18, he was named South American correspondent for Billboard Magazine, where he initiated the magazine's coverage of the music and media scenes in the region, from the emergence of rock en español to the launch of MTV in Brazil.

Pablo attended the USC School of International Relations and graduated in 1994. While there, he continued his involvement with computer networks and joined the temp worker pool at Warner Bros. and later at Disney. Soon after graduating from college and while temping at Disney, Pablo founded hollywood.net, which he envisioned as a means of getting the big movie studios online. In a time in which the most popular internal means of communication at most media companies were still the ubiquitous inter-office manila paper envelopes, Pablo failed to persuade his superiors to give the idea of a Hollywood-wide computer network a shot.

Searching for new horizons, Pablo moved to the East Coast in 1995 where he found work in New York City, first as a translator and then working in advertising. As the Internet began to revolutionize the entire American economy, Pablo joined a group of independent professionals that helped NYC-based companies, primarily in the financial sector, to begin offering online services to their customers.

In 1999, with three other tech consultants, Pablo founded Sabueso (meaning “bloodhound” in Spanish), an online search engine. They set up shop in a space recently vacated by an ethnic beauty parlor on 94th and Amsterdam (Rosie's Shear Magic). Unlike another well-known search engine venture that began around the same time, though, Sabueso didn't survive the dot-com bubble burst and in early 2001 the company was forced to shut down.

In the summer of 2001, Pablo was accepted to HEC-Paris, the top business school in Europe. He attended HEC in Paris, an exchange program at the London Business School and worked over the summer in Madrid. When the program was over in 2003, he returned to the U.S. where he was involved in an online music startup in Miami, set up a small consultancy to help new business start-ups, and joined a Fortune 500 Top 20 company as a technology consultant. He also began writing political commentary and appearing on radio and TV. In 2004, Pablo began publishing Diario de América, the first political opinion journal edited in Spanish in the United States.

In 2009, Pablo came back to Los Angeles and settled down in Sherman Oaks. He continued his work as a commentator and became the alternate host of the highest-rated national political talk show on the Univision radio network. He also founded El Medio, the first journal and news syndicate about Middle Eastern affairs edited in Spanish, whose main objective is to provide readers in Spain and Latin America with perspectives about the region that are more aligned with Western ideas of freedom and democracy.

In September 2011, Pablo co-founded his current venture: Urbita, a small network of local search and travel-related online services that is especially popular in emerging markets and currently receives 15 million monthly users.

 

 

 

 

Pablo Kleinman for Congress 2014 Official Picture

This picture is (c) Copyright 2014 Pablo Kleinman for Congress. It may be freely copied and utilized under CC-BY-SA 3.0.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/pablokleinman/

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